Samplab AI-Powered Sample Editor Is Now On Desktop

Samplab AI-powered sample editor is now available for desktop. We spoke about the Samplab plugin in mid-late 2021, and it seemed like a pretty exciting prospect.

Samplab allows you to turn your harmonic samples to MIDI, which you can then edit in various ways.

Typically, when turning audio to MIDI through different methods, we are doing it to borrow the chord progression or melodic line. With Samplab, we are maintaining the sound of the original sample, which creates a sort of virtual instrument that we can dictate.

In theory, we can now take a sample that’s almost a perfect fit and make it perfect. More importantly, we can make overused but awesome samples unique by changing structure, melody, and harmony.

I know different producers hear different qualities in samples and flip/chop them accordingly. But, it doesn’t hurt at all to have some extra options at your fingertips.

The Samplab desktop version comes with a range of additional features that aren’t available through the plugin.

  • Advanced audio warping
  • Key detection
  • Automatic key and tempo adjust
  • Making notes longer
  • adjusting volume of notes
  • adding an offset to notes

Some of those new features help improve your workflow by doing some tedious tasks for you. But there are some creative additions, too.

Features like advanced audio warping are great for making a sample fit without losing the quality of the instrument.

I also like that you can adjust the volume of the notes, which means we can start to play with dynamics. I imagine this will work better on some sources than others, but the fact that we can think about dynamics is pretty cool.

Talking about sources, you still have a few days to enter our Mixxed sample subscription service giveaway, so do it now.

With more new features in the pipeline, the desktop version of Samplab seems ideal for anyone who often flips samples.

With that said, I know some users experienced issues with the plugin, more specifically, the drag and drop functionality. It seemed to work more smoothly in certain DAWs, but not all had the same experience regardless of DAW choice. Hopefully, any potential issues are a thing of the past.

As samples are sent to a server for processing, you need an internet connection when uploading new material. Once you have the returned MIDI, you can work offline if you choose. More info on the process and security is available via the Samplab website.

Samplab is available in two subscription plans, Basic (free download) and Premium ($7.99 p/m early adopter price). Both plans include access to Samplab desktop and plugin versions.

The Basic plan is limited to ten seconds per audio file and mono output. Premium allows for up to 100 seconds and stereo output.

You can grab a seven-day free trial of Premium if you are unsure.

More info: Samplab

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