Darwin Grosse

Composer, developer & Art + Music + Technology podcast host Darwin Grosse has died.

He had recently announced that he was ending his podcast because of his health issues.

“While I wish this could continue, I’m afraid it no longer can. Two years ago, I was diagnosed with kidney cancer, and began treatments and procedures that have left me greatly fatigued,” he noted. “Early last week, it became clear to me that my health complications will prevent me from dedicating the time and concentration to AMT that I strive to achieve. As a result, I will be discontinuing the podcast production permanently.”

The news of his death has been shared by friends via Facebook.

Darwin Grosse was a composer & synthesist, a writer, the Director of Education and Customer Services at Cycling ’74 (developers of Max) and a hardware developer.

He released several solo albums via Bandcamp, including The Means Of Production and 2600.repast, and he collaborated with Colorado-based synthesist Mark Mosher as (no)poem.

Darwin Grosse created ArdCore, an Arduino-based programmable module for MU and Eurorack systems.

As a writer, Grosse authored dozens of articles for Recording magazine. For years, he wrote and edited the site CreativeSynth.com. He wrote the book series Modular Synth Mastery. And he created educational content like 20 Objects, “A Pragmatic Method for Learning Max/MSP/Jitter and Max for Live”.

As part of his Masters Degree program, Grosse developed the ArdCore platform,  an Arduino-based multi-function device for modular synthesizers. ArdCore is an early example of an open source hardware + software platform in the modular world.

The module, which has been made available in both MU and Eurorack formats, can be loaded with a wide range of firmware, so it can be used as a quantizer, sequencer, clock divider, gate sequencer and more.

Darwin Grosse was most widely known, though, as the host of the Art + Music + Technology podcast.

His wide-ranging background meant that he was equally at home interviewing synth pioneers like Morton Subotnick, tech gurus like Native Instrument co-founder Stephan Schmitt and keyboard gods like Herbie Hancock. He hosted more than 380+ episodes, which are a massive resource for synthesists.

Episodes of the Art + Music + Technology podcast are available via the podcast site.

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